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Anise (pimpinella anisum)

Revision for “Anise (pimpinella anisum)” created on November 6, 2013 @ 23:01:33 [Autosave]

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Anise (pimpinella anisum)
<h2><strong style="line-height: 1.714285714; font-size: 1rem;"><a href="http://www.shareayurveda.com/ayurvedic-dictionary/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Koehler1887-PimpinellaAnisum.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-911 alignright" alt="Anise Pimpinella Anisum" src="http://www.shareayurveda.com/ayurvedic-dictionary/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Koehler1887-PimpinellaAnisum-264×300.jpg" width="264" height="300" /></a>Description of the Anise Plant</strong></h2>
<span style="line-height: 1.714285714; font-size: 1rem;">Anise is an herbaceous annual, flowering-plant, from the “apiaceae” family, that grows to between 2 and 3 feet tall and 1-2 feet wide. Pimpinella anisum has white, to yellow-white “umbels” that bloom in the summer time. The leaves of the Anise plant are said to look very similar to “Queen Ann’s Lace”, and very fern-like in appearance. Anise is thought to be a native to the Mediterranean and S.W. Asian regions.</span>

<strong>Flavor and Aroma: </strong>Anise has a spicy, yet sweet flavor and an aroma that is similar to black licorice. Pimpinella anisum, has often been compared to licorice/liquorice, fennel, and tarragon in both flavor and aroma.

<strong>Growing Anise in your herb garden: </strong>Anise will self-seed after the first time you plant it, so expect to have it come back next year, without the extra work of re-planting it. For initial planting, plant pimpinella anisum seeds directly into the soil they will be grown in, or you may start your pimpinella anisum seeds indoors – approximately 8 weeks before final front in your area, then transplant them into the ground – after final frost.

Your anise plants will grow best in full sunlight, when planted in a light, well-drained soil, with little to no fertilizer. Plant in rows about 1 foot apart, in groups of 4-6 plants.

Plant pimpinella anisum near cilantro, and watch them both flourish – they make GREAT companions!

<strong style="line-height: 1.714285714; font-size: 1rem;">Pests/Diseases: </strong>Anise is resistant to most pests, and will rarely see disease. The anise plant will make a great, pest and disease-free, addition to your herb garden.

<strong>Harvesting Anise: </strong>Harvest the leaves of the anise plant – in the summer, before the flowers bloom.  The seeds if Anise may be harvested in early-fall, once they have fully ripened. Harvest the seeds late in the morning, after any dew has dried.

To harvest the seeds, cover the “seed heads” first, then snip them off.

<strong>Drying Anise after harvest: </strong>To dry the leaves of the anise plant, cut the stems from the main stalk, and hang-dry.

Chopped leaves may be stored for later use by freezing them.

<strong>Uses for Anise (pimpinella anisum): </strong>

<strong></strong>Cooking:Anise leaves are commonly used in salads, as well as meat dishes such as; chicken and fish, and also makes a great addition to many veggie dishes. The seeds are also used in salads, as well as in baked goods like; bread, bagels, and desserts.

medicinal uses:Anise is said to have many medical/herbal uses. For years anise has been used to aid digestion, as well as ease coughs from the common cold.

<strong> Other uses for Anise (pimpinella anisum):</strong>The seeds of the Anise herb plant, are often used whole, or ground and used as a natural flavouring agent for tasty treats like; black jelly beans, many liquors, licorice, and even some root beers! Anise has also been said to help fishermen land their catch. I hear rumour from several fishermen, who claim putting the scent of anise on their fishing lures has helped them land huge fish!

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